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Third Year Writing Course Descriptions Fall 2015



ENG 3010:  The New Yorker in Nashville    Smith Whitehouse
In this course, your essential text will be this fall’s upcoming issues of the New Yorker magazine, the most prominent literary magazine published in the United States. Since it began in 1925, the New Yorker has been celebrated as a lively multi-genre journal known for its fact-checking, research, and style. We’ll be reading the New Yorker as writers who draft and revise our pieces with an aim to imitate the New Yorker's purpose, process, and format. Working in small groups, we will analyze, compose, and revise in genres such as profiles, reporter-at-large (or multi-method research) pieces, cartoons, reviews, satires, and more. Each small group, acting as an editorial board, will compile, design, edit, and produce its own magazine, and we will celebrate our collective work as a class near the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, our main focus will always be on the concepts and processes of composition and critical thinking as the course is designed both to demonstrate how writing functions as a means of critical inquiry and to stress the centrality of writing to intellectual life.  If you choose to enroll in this course, please go ahead and subscribe to the print version New Yorker at least through the end of December; many alumni of this course report that they enjoy reading the New Yorker long after the course ends, so you might decide to go ahead and subscribe for a year. (You may also subscribe to the online version, but you must have the magazine in print for our class). If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Dr. Bonnie at bonnie.smith@belmont.edu.

ENG 3010: Belmont East. A New York State of Mind: Writing Place in the Big Apple    Pinter
This course asks you to do many kinds of writing gathered under a loose topic of “place.”  We will read from many different critics about what constitutes a place, but that would be dry and meaningless without your own special understanding of place.  “Place” as a theme is because you are in one of the most exciting places on earth, and I want you to spend some time fully dwelling in that place, as well as reflecting on what makes it what it is.  Only students enrolled in Belmont East may take this class.  All class readings and writings require students to be in New York.

ENG 3010: Belmont West. LA: Writing Place in the Land Where Dreams are Made     Pinter
This course asks you to do many kinds of writing gathered under a loose topic of “place.”  We will read from many different critics about what constitutes a place, but that would be dry and meaningless without your own special understanding of place.  “Place” as a theme is because you are in the land where “dreams are made.” I want you to spend some time fully dwelling in that place, as well as reflecting on what makes it what it is.  Only students enrolled in Belmont East may take this class. All class readings and writings require students to be in Los Angeles.

ENG 3010:  The New Yorker in Nashville   Stover 
In this course, your essential text will be this fall’s upcoming issues of the New Yorker magazine, the most prominent literary magazine published in the United States. Since it began in 1925, the New Yorker has been celebrated as a lively multi-genre journal known for its fact-checking, research, and style. We’ll be reading the New Yorker as writers who aim to imitate its purpose, process, and format. 
Working in small groups, we will write and analyze genres such as profiles, reporter-at-large pieces, cartoons, poems, satires, and more. Each group, acting as an editorial board, will compile, design, edit, and produce its own magazine, and we will celebrate our collective work publicly near the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, our main focus will always be on the concepts and processes of composition and critical thinking as the course is designed both to demonstrate how writing functions as a means of critical inquiry and to stress the centrality of writing to intellectual life. 

ENG 3010 Third Year Writing    Lovvorn
In this section of Third Year Writing, we will explore three broadly connected themes: service, poverty, and literacy. As part of our process, we will examine academic research and narrative accounts that expand our understanding of these key concepts. In addition, throughout the semester, we will engage in a service relationship with a Nashville community partner. This work will enable us to approach course themes from an embodied, experiential perspective and will inform the course's reflective writing components. In addition to reflective writing, the course involves writing in an academic mode, including the completion of an annotated bibliography and a research project. Here, students will be encouraged to pursue research connected to a major or minor field of study or to another personal interest. For all writing efforts, the course will consistently stress ways to make prose clear and graceful through drafting, reviewing, and revising.

ENG 3010 Writing that Matters   McDonough
What makes writing matter? What pieces of writing matter to you? How can writing make a difference? How can you use writing to accomplish specific ends? To inform? Persuade? What difference does research make? How do you know if something you read is reliable or if its supporting evidence is real? How do writers convey their ideas convincingly to encourage action in their readers? What difference does it make if an argument is based on faulty logic or questionable data? And how can a reader tell? First from a personal and then from a professional perspective, we will be investigating these questions in order to arrive at an understanding of how to identify, research, and create writing that matters in your personal and, most importantly, your professional life.

ENG 3010 Interdisciplinary Look at Ireland     Balding, K.
In English 3010 we will read and write on an advanced level with the following unifying theme: An Interdisciplinary Look at Ireland.  We will read stories and factual accounts related to Ireland.  We will also read what many of Ireland’s writers have to say about Ireland. Other mediums of discussion will revolve around film, art, and music.  Readings, topics, and discussions will include the Celtic people, the myth and legend of Ireland and her people, An Gorta Mor/The Great Famine, The Easter Rebellion of 1916, The Troubles, and the Irish Diaspora. That said we will spend a great deal of time writing about such both reflectively and purposely. Researched assignments will include a look at Ireland through your particular discipline and/or interest. 



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