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Third Year Writing Course Descriptions



Spring 2015

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                              Kimberly Balding                  
In English 3010 we will read and write on an advanced level with the following unifying theme: An Interdisciplinary Look at Ireland.  We will read stories and factual accounts related to Ireland.  We will also read what many of Ireland’s writers have to say about Ireland. Other mediums of discussion will revolve around film, art, and music.  Readings, topics, and discussion will include the Celtic people, the myth and legend of Ireland and her people,  An Gorta Mor/The Great Famine, The Easter Rebellion of 1916, The Troubles, and the Irish Diaspora. That said we will spend a great deal of time writing about such both reflectively and purposely. Assignments will be varied but will include a look at Ireland through your particular discipline and/or interest.  


ENG 3010                                                                                                                                              Dr. Wyeth Burgess
From Inspiration to Perspiration and Profession: My Voice and Vocation
Our theme is the study of and evaluation of your path within the culture of your major and aspired field through observation, reading, writing, and listening. Through essays, film and interviews we will consider the meaning of work, the cultures of different fields, the reality of the daily grind, sources of inspiration and the meaning of that elusive “American dream.”  Texts include selections from C. P. Snow’s The Two Cultures, Studs Terkel’s Working, and the Penguin collection of Fifty Great Essays (DiYanni). We will watch such films as Death of a Salesman, Norma Rae, All the President’s Men, Gandhi, October Sky, Wall Street, Barbershop and Coal Miner’s Daughter. Students will use The Little Seagull Handbook to help them craft an insightful paper about the culture of the workplace to which they aspire, their sources of inspiration and their own places within the contexts of their fields.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                      Victoria Doner
Finding Your Place in the World
Through the fun and magic of words we will have daring and exhilarating adventures—wing walking with Ormer Locklear, jumping, jiving, an’ wailing under the stars at Gatsby’s parties, singing with Ella Fitzgerald, climbing a “monster” tree, debating with a film director, and enjoying the sweet friendship between a spider and a pig.   We will meet people—Shel Silverstein, Arnold Spirit and his wonderful grandmother, Steve Jobs, Nick Carraway, Bessie Coleman, Marina Keegan, Wilbur and Charlotte—who will help us discover how we want to live our lives.  They will challenge us to see ourselves and our world in new and different ways.  We will learn how to make our writing come alive—alive with ideas and alive with our own voices.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                           Dr. Bonnie Smith Whitehouse
The New Yorker in Nashville
In this course, your essential text will be this spring’s upcoming issues of the New Yorker magazine, the most prominent literary magazine published in the United States. Since it began in 1925, the New Yorker has been celebrated as a lively multi-genre journal known for its fact-checking, research, and style. We’ll be reading the New Yorker as writers who aim to imitate its purpose, process, and format.  Working in small groups, we will write and analyze genres such as profiles, reporter-at-large pieces, cartoons, poems, satires, and more. Each group, acting as an editorial board, will compile, design, edit, and produce its own magazine, and we will celebrate our collective work publicly near the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, our main focus will always be on the concepts and processes of composition and critical thinking as the course is designed both to demonstrate how writing functions as a means of critical inquiry and to stress the centrality of writing to intellectual life. 

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                    Dr. Caresse John
We all know the saying “it’s all a matter of perspective.” In this section of 3010, we are going to examine that theory. Is it all, in fact, a matter of perspective? What role does perspective play in our lives? Using readings from across the disciplines and writing assignments that require the adoption of multiple perspectives, students will define, clarify, refine, and revise their own perspectives.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                     Dr. Doug Murray
Taught online.   A study of popular genres; each student will research content and consumers of a genre of popular entertainment.  Text: Lynn S. Neal, Romancing God:  Evangelical Women and Devotional Fiction.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                   Dr. Gary McDowell
 “Misdirection: The Magic of Writing”
What is magic? Is it, “Pick a card, any card”? Yes. But there are nine other categories of effects we magicians use to baffle, confuse, contradict, and entertain.  They are: production, transformation, vanish, restoration, teleportation, escape, levitation, penetration, and prediction.  We float across the stage on a hover board, we walk through The Wall of China, we make elephants and jumbo jets disappear, sure, but we also predict a card chosen at random, we also transform a dollar bill into a blank piece of paper, we also know what you’re thinking before you’re thinking it.  But how? Oh come on, do you really think I’m going to tell you?  Nope. Not now.  But come fall, all bets are off. We will learn here, in ENG 3010: Misdirection: The Magic of Writing, that magic can teach us about how we communicate, how we manipulate our worlds and truths and opinions, how we can best approach our audiences so we can be heard. It turns out that performing a magic trick and writing about our topsy-turvy lives aren’t that different. There’s plenty of magic in our everyday lives; miracles happen every day. You will learn sleight-of-hand; you will write about your experiences with magic (both the everyday and illusionary kinds); and you will learn to see the world, through readings/viewings (TBD, though will certainly be several books, articles, a couple films, etc) and experiments and experiences, one step ahead of your audience.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                           Jason Lovvorn
In this section of Third Year Writing, we will explore three broadly connected themes: service, poverty, and literacy. As part of our process, we will examine academic research and narrative accounts that expand our understanding of these key concepts. In addition, throughout the semester, we will engage in a service relationship with a Nashville community partner. This work will enable us to approach course themes from an embodied, experiential perspective and will inform the course's reflective writing components. In addition to reflective writing, the course involves writing in an academic vein, including the completion of an annotated bibliography and a research project. Here, students will be encouraged to pursue research connected to a major or minor field of study or to another personal interest. For all writing efforts, the course will consistently stress ways to make prose clear and graceful through drafting, reviewing, and revising. 
PLEASE NOTE:  The class is designated as a Service Learning section, and service is an integrated and required part of the course. 

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                    Dr. Jayme M. Yeo
What does school have to do with your soul?
This class invites students to freely explore connections between spirituality, learning, and life in order to better understand the search for meaning and how we find it in our daily experiences. Our conversations on spirituality will not only touch on traditional religious belief, but also artistic creativity, ethical living, human flourishing, and non-traditional religious identities such as spiritual secularism. In order to understand the relationship between spirituality and learning, both historically and today, we will read a variety of materials, including nonfiction books, fictional novels, academic articles, and newspaper stories. Ultimately, this course aims to help students become more insightful thinkers by improving critical skills through writing both personally and academically on this subject. Assignments will include weekly written responses and a research paper that explores connections between your academic field or future career and some aspect of spiritual identity.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                 Dr. Robbie Pinter
This section of 3010 SL is a service learning course.  We will address the theme of literacy as we work in an after school program middle school and younger students as they work to shape their own literacies. Also, we will approach this theme from a variety of different angles.  For instance, we will look at literacy’s effects, its absences, and its social significances.  We will consider traditional forms of literacy such as reading and writing, but we will also think about other areas like media, art, and other digital literacies.  All students will engage in helping others in their literacy development as part of the SL requirement.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                              Dr. Andrea Stover
The New Yorker in Nashville
In this course, your essential text will be this spring’s upcoming issues of the New Yorker magazine, the most prominent literary magazine published in the United States. Since it began in 1925, the New Yorker has been celebrated as a lively multi-genre journal known for its fact-checking, research, and style. We’ll be reading the New Yorker as writers who aim to imitate its purpose, process, and format.  Working in small groups, we will write and analyze genres such as profiles, reporter-at-large pieces, cartoons, poems, satires, and more. Each group, acting as an editorial board, will compile, design, edit, and produce its own magazine, and we will celebrate our collective work publicly near the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, our main focus will always be on the concepts and processes of composition and critical thinking as the course is designed both to demonstrate how writing functions as a means of critical inquiry and to stress the centrality of writing to intellectual life. 

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                              Dr. Susan Finch
This course is focused on the intersection of technology and American culture and how changes in social communication have impacted the ways we connect, learn, and live. We will discuss everything from robots to social networking. During the semester, students will write one research-based paper, one technology narrative, one annotated bibliography project, a research proposal, a group presentation, and several responses to assigned readings and films. In order to help students grow as writers, assignments will range from informal responses to discussion questions, summaries, explications, and the proper citation of sources.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                        Dr. Amy Hodges Hamilton
Maya Angelou once said that writing provides her with a feeling of wholeness.  In this third-year writing course, we will look at how writing about the psychology of our lives and our disciplines can lead to growth.  We will study writing and psychology through a range of lenses: memoirs, biographies, case studies, psychological analysis, as well as through our own writing processes.  In addition, you will learn how to analyze and enhance your own, your peers’, and professional writing to learn more about writing conventions in your respective disciplines, research options, stylistic alternatives, and audience expectations.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                   Dr. Joel Overall
Composing Experience, Creating Experience
Noted rhetorical scholar Gregory Clark claims, “ideas and arguments bind people together or push them apart, but aesthetic experience does that as well and perhaps to greater effect.” For this course, we will investigate Clark’s description of aesthetic experience by reading about how writers represent their own experiences or use words, sounds, rhetorical forms, and images to create experiences for their audience. To do so, we’ll read works by A.J. Jacobs (My Life as an Experiment) and José Saramago (Blindness), listen to audio stories from This American Life, and interact with digital stories presented on Pitchfork and at the Sundance Film Festival. While the majority of assignments for this course will be written, including a 2500-3000 word research assignment, one assignment will ask students to integrate written text with other modes of meaning such as sound, image, music, or video to emphasize audience experience of writing.

ENG 3010                                                                                                                                                   Dr. Cynthia Cox
This course will explore the question "What can children's literature teach adult readers?" We will analyze the visual rhetoric of picturebooks, research controversial children's books that parents have sought to ban from school libraries and classrooms, and consider how subjects related to our majors are represented in children's books. Texts include Where the Wild Things Are, The Stinky Cheese Man, Charlotte's Web, and Lemony Snicket's The Ba
d Beginning
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