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Policies and Procedures



Student Organization Defined:

A student organization is a group of currently-enrolled Belmont University students who form
together for a common purpose, for which they do not receive academic credit. Any group of students which meets regularly, elects or appoints officers, collects dues, conducts a program or in any other way consistently functions as an organization is required to seek university recognition through the Office of Student Activities.

If an organization has a relationship with an outside or inter/national entity the policies and procedures of Belmont will supersede any of the outside affiliation. In no way do the goals, values, or events of an individual student organization represent those of the entire Belmont community.

Student Organization Behavioral Expectations

Student organization recognition comes with many privileges.  With those privileges come expectations related to the behavior of student leaders and organizational members.  Leaders and members of student organizations at Belmont University are expected to uphold all facets of the University’s Community Commitments and other policies found in The Bruin Guide.  As an expression of the institution's vision, mission and values, student organizations and their members are expected to commit themselves to individual worth; personal integrity; critical thinking; self-control; and community responsibility.  Additionally, when engaging in organizational activity, leaders and members are expected to:

  • Positively represent the overall character, mission and values of Belmont University.  Actions within the group, programs sponsored and the overall reputation of the organization ought to illustrate and advance the mission and Community Commitments of the university and model its highest aspirations for life in community.  As a Christian university, we expect our student organizations and their members to behave in a manner that represents the Christian ideals of stewardship, faith, service and honesty.
  • Conduct a consistent life on and off campus, on and off duty, in real and virtual/on-line contexts because credibility depends on student organization leaders and members acting in congruence with both their personal and university values regardless of the context of their actions.  
  • Comply with university policies regarding expression, discussion and debate. Such activity may not disrupt the orderly functioning of the university.
  • Actively value and honor the similarities, differences and contributions of every individual as a unique and contributing member of the Belmont University community.

Organizational Activity

Belmont University affirms students’ opportunities to be involved in the campus and community, and student organizations provide one avenue to enrich the co-curricular experience.  Organizational activity significantly influences individual experience and the campus culture in general.  For this reason, the activities of student organizations’ members and guests are expected to be congruent with the University’s Community Commitments and to abide by all University rules, policies and procedures.  This expectation applies to all organizational activities both on and off campus.

Additionally, activities planned or hosted by an individual member(s) of an organization may be considered organizational activities.  Please note: the degree to which an organization is responsible for the activity of its members is not necessarily dependent upon the number of members engaging in the activity.  When the act, event, or activity grows out of, or is directly related to, the student organization’s activities or an environment created and knowingly permitted by the organization, or when a member of an organization is violating local, state or federal law, the organization may be held responsible and may be subject to disciplinary action.

The following questions guide consideration of whether an event will be considered organizational activity:

  • What is the purpose of the activity?
  • Who is attending the activity?  Why are they attending?  Is it mandatory for members?
  • What resources on funding are supporting the event?
  • How is the event being publicized or communicated?
  • Has organizational leadership (e.g. President, Advisor, Chairperson, etc.) helped to coordinate this activity or is leadership participating?
  • Would a reasonable person think this activity is associated with your organization?

Belmont University is not responsible for any injury, damage, debt or other liability caused by the acts or omissions of student organizations that are in violation of the University’s Community Commitments, Student Organization Behavioral Expectations or other university policies found in The Bruin Guide.

If your organization needs assistance in determining if an activity is organizational in nature, a member should contact the Office of Student Activities for clarification prior to the activity.

University Recognition for New Student Organization Application

When a group of students meets the definition of a student organization, it is required to apply for formal recognition by Belmont University. Recognition provides Belmont University the opportunity to extend resources and support to student organizations and to manage opportunities to enhance the student experience, enrich the campus community, and advance the mission and vision of the university. After receiving University recognition, student organization must remain in good standing and must annually renew their recognition status. Failure to annually renew recognition status will result in the organization being placed on inactive status.  For more information regarding maintaining University Recognition please refer to the Student Organization Handbook. All recognized student organizations must comply with University policies and procedures. These policies and procedures are found in, but not limited to, The Bruin Guide, the Student Organization Handbook, and the Office of Student Activities.

Intent to Organize Process

The process for University Recognition starts with a consultation with the Office of Student Activities, typically with the Assistant Director of Student Activities, and the student(s) interested in starting a new organization.  This meeting provides an opportunity to dialogue about the intention of the organization, assures that there is not mission duplication with other existing organizations, addresses alignment with the university mission and provides support in navigating the recognition process.

After this consultation, prospective organizations are allowed to hold up to three (3) on-campus group meetings with expressed written permission from the Office of Student Activities.  The presiding officer will provide the Office of Student Activities with the date, time and location for each of the three meetings.  No official activities or events may be sponsored until a group has received official university recognition.  Under no circumstance may an organization going through the recognition process use the Belmont University name or logo.

In order to assure consistent training and education for all student organizations, the University considers new organization request for recognition twice a year. All applications must be submitted by the third Friday of classes after the start of the term to the Office of Student Activities.

The following steps are required after the consultation with the Office of Student Activities in order to apply for University Recognition:

  • University Recognition Request Form: Complete on-line form in its entirety
  • Governing Documents: Provide an electronic copy of the proposed organization’s bylaws, constitution, and any other defining or governing documents. (Sample bylaws and constitution are provided at the informational meeting.)
  • Leadership: Identify organization officers including their email addresses, BUID #’s, and phone numbers. Each student organization must have a Presiding Officer (e.g. president, director, chair, etc), a Vice President, an Event Services Contact, and a Financial Officer.  Other suggested positions include, secretary, and historian.
  • Organization Rationale: Provide a one page rationale that outlines how the organization’s mission and activity will:
    1. Be congruent with Belmont’s Mission, Vision and Values
    2. Represent a contribution to the existing campus life and the overall student experience
    3. Demonstrate how organizational activity will support an environment of inclusiveness and develop community.
  • Membership: Provide an electronic list of prospective members that have expressed a commitment to join the organization if it is institutionally recognized. Belmont insists that there is enough interest from students that will sustain the organization beyond its initial founders. 
  • Advisor: Provide contact information for the proposed organization faculty/staff advisor. All Belmont faculty and staff members are eligible to serve as advisors of recognized organizations. Please refer to the Student Organization Classifications document to determine if an advisor is recommended or required for your student organization.
  • Classification. Review the Student Organization Classifications for information for a detailed description of each classification and their privileges and responsibilities.  Provide the Office of Student Activities with a recommendation for classification status that best fits the purpose and description of the anticipated organization. Any organization requesting Affiliated status must provide, in writing, confirmation from a University representative from the respective department/college that the organization would be affiliating with.  

Final Approval Process

Upon submission of the completed Student Organization Application for University Recognition the Office of Student Activities reviews all provided documents in order to ensure:

  • Completion of all required forms
  • Consonance with University Mission
  • Contribution to Campus Life
  • Demonstrated commitment to developing community

For organizations satisfying the initial review, Student Activities will present the application to
the Student Life Council, a committee of the Faculty Senate comprised of faculty, staff and students,
for review and possible recommendations regarding the purpose and activity of the organization
relative to the university’s Mission and Community Commitments.


Finally, the Office of Student Activities considers Student Life Council recommendations and
conveys or denies university recognition.  Organization Presidents and Advisors, will be notified via
email.

Newly-recognized student organizations must participate in the New Student Organization Orientation & Training Session led by the Office of Student Activities. No organizational activity may occur prior to completion of this orientation and training.

Withdrawal of University Recognition

Student organization recognition comes with many privileges.  As the University grants these privileges upon conveying official recognition, it can withdraw them for cause.  An organization found not living into the mission and purpose agreed upon by the organization and the Office of Student Activities, may lose privileges or may be placed on probation.  Additionally, any organization found responsible for a major violation of University policies or found responsible for a series of violations of University policies may lose privileges, may be placed on probation, or may lose official University recognition status.  

Anti-Hazing Policy

Belmont University is committed to the values of individual worth, personal integrity, critical thinking, self control, community responsibility, and providing an atmosphere that nurtures the individual’s self-esteem and growth. Hazing or any other activity that is an affront to the dignity and self-respect of any person is strictly prohibited by the university. Additionally, hazing is prohibited by law in the state of Tennessee (TN Code 49-7-123).Any individual or organization found in violation of the anti-hazing policy is subject to university disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution. Any retaliation against any person who reports, is a witness to, is involved with or cooperates with the adjudication of hazing is strictly prohibited.

The University prohibits hazing by individuals or groups and defines it as follows:  

Hazing is any reckless or intentional act, occurring on or off campus, that produces physical, mental, or emotional pain, discomfort, humiliation, embarrassment, or ridicule directed toward other students or groups (regardless of their willingness to participate), that is required or expected for affiliation and which is not related to the mission of the team, group, or organization. This includes any activity, whether it is presented as optional or required, that places individuals in a position of servitude as a condition of affiliation. Prohibited acts of hazing include but are not limited to those covered under Tennessee State law.  All students are subject to federal, state and local laws, and rules and regulations of Belmont University

A person or organization violates the Anti-Hazing policy if they: 

  • engage in hazing;
  • solicit, encourage, direct, aid, or attempt to aid another in engaging in hazing;
  • intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly permit hazing to occur; or
  • have firsthand knowledge of the planning of a specific hazing incident involving a student in an educational institution, or firsthand knowledge that a specific hazing incident has occurred, and knowingly fail to report said knowledge in writing to the Dean of Students or other appropriate officials of the institution.  

Though it would be impossible to list all behavior that may be considered hazing, the following are some examples of hazing and are prohibited:

  • any physical act of violence expected of, or inflicted upon, another including marking or branding
  • any physical activity expected of, or inflicted upon, another, including calisthenics; sleep deprivation or excessive fatigue as the result of an activity, lines-ups and berating
  • any activity involving consumption of a food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug, or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or which adversely effects the mental or physical health or safety of the student
  • pressure or coercion of another to consume any legal or illegal substance
  • making available unlawful substances
  • completing tasks in order to obtains signatures
  • required carrying of or possessing of a specific item or items
  • servitude (expecting a new member to do the tasks of an experienced member)
  • scavenger or treasure hunts
  • forced exposure to the weather
  • assignment of illegal and unlawful activities
  • kidnapping, forced road trips, and abandonment
  • costuming and alteration of appearance
  • coerced lewd conduct; degrading games, activities or public stunts
  • interference with academic pursuits

 

If an organization has any questions about hazing, or would like education and training regarding the anti-hazing policy please contact the Office of Student Activities.

Hazing “Myths and Facts” 

Myth No. 1: Hazing is primarily a problem for fraternities and sororities.

Fact: Hazing is a societal problem. Hazing incidents have been frequently documented in the military, athletic teams, marching bands, religious cults, professional schools and other types of clubs and/or organizations. Reports of hazing activities in high schools are on the rise.

Myth No. 2: Hazing is no more than foolish pranks that sometimes go awry.

Fact: Hazing is an act of power and control over others – it is victimization. Hazing is pre-meditated and NOT accidental. Hazing is abusive, degrading and often life-threatening.

Myth No. 3: As long as there’s no malicious intent, a little hazing should be OK.

Fact: Even if there’s no malicious “intent,” safety may still be a factor in traditional hazing activities that are considered to be “all in good fun.” For example, serious accidents have occurred during scavenger hunts and kidnapping trips. Besides, what purpose do such activities serve in promoting the growth and development of group team members?

Myth No. 4: Hazing is an effective way to teach respect and develop discipline.

Fact: First of all, respect must be EARNED—not taught. Victims of hazing rarely report having respect for those who have hazed them. Just like other forms of victimization, hazing breeds mistrust, apathy and alienation.

Myth No. 5: If someone agrees to participate in an activity, it can’t be considered hazing.

Fact: In states that have laws against hazing, consent of the victim can’t be used as a defense in a civil suit. This is because even if someone agrees to participate in a potentially hazardous action it may not be true consent when considering the peer pressure and desire to belong to the group.

Myth No. 6: It’s difficult to determine whether or
not a certain activity is hazing—it’s such a gray
area sometimes.

Fact: It’s not difficult to decide if an activity is
hazing if you use common sense and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is alcohol involved?
  • Will active/current members of the group refuse to participate with the new members and do exactly what they’re being asked to do?
  • Does the activity risk emotional or physical abuse?
  • Is there risk of injury or a question of safety?
  • Do you have any reservation describing the activity to your parents, to a professor or university official?
  • Would you object to the activity being photographed for the school newspaper or filmed by the local TV news crew?

If the answer to any of these questions is “yes,” the activity is probably hazing.

**Adapted from: StopHazing.org, Educating to Eliminate Hazing. Copyright StopHazing.org 1998-2001. www.stophazing.org

Substance-free Campus Policy

Belmont University is committed to self-control and the respect for self and others that enables all individuals to develop intellectually, spiritually, socially, emotionally and physically. Therefore, the university is committed to an environment free of alcohol, illegal drugs, legal proximates of illegal drug, and misuse of legal drugs.

It is a violation of Belmont’s Community Commitments and its Substance-Free Campus Policy to consume, possess, or be intoxicated by alcohol or drugs or to be in the presence of alcohol or drugs regardless of your own use, possession, or intoxication on campus. Further, it is a violation to have paraphernalia on campus (such as empty bottles, posters, shot glasses, etc.) that supports, promotes, or facilitates usage of alcohol or drugs. Finally, distribution of alcohol or drugs on campus is a violation meriting an escalated disciplinary response. Violations may result in the imposition of one or more of the sanctions described in the Bruin Guide.

To facilitate student understanding of specific behaviors that violate the Substance-Free Campus Policy, the following definitions are provided:

  • Consumption, which is considered use of alcohol or drugs. Student need not be in the act of consuming; rather, information indicative of recent consumption constitutes a violation.
  • Intoxication, which is considered a student being in an altered state of mind at the time of the incident. Students found responsible for intoxication are also responsible for consumption. Due to the danger to the student and our community, intoxication escalates the university’s response.
  • Possession, which is considered actual presence of alcohol or drugs. When no alcohol or drugs are actually present, information may suggest the student is responsible for consumption and/or paraphernalia, but not possession.
  • Paraphernalia, which ranges from items that support or promote alcohol or drugs (like posters, clothing, etc.) to items that contained or are employed in the use of alcohol or other drugs. Paraphernalia indicative of consumption may receive a response similar to consumption.
  • Complicity, which is considered a student being in the presence of alcohol or drugs and does not require actual consumption, intoxication, possession or paraphernalia by or belonging to that student.
  • Distribution, which is the provision of alcohol, illegal drugs, legal proximates of illegal drugs, or legal drugs proscribed to the distributor to others, whether or not for profit. Due to the danger to our community, distribution escalates the university’s response.

University Response to Violations

Belmont takes its responsibility to facilitate the positive development of students seriously. Consequently, it reserves the right to impose disciplinary sanctions for violations of the Substance-Free Campus Policy. The severity of the applicable sanction depends upon a number of factors including, but not limited to, the student's past history of disciplinary infraction, the amount or nature of alcohol or drugs involved, and the cooperativeness of the student during the investigation and disciplinary process. Any student found responsible for a violation may be subject to disciplinary sanctions that are listed in the Bruin Guide, including required participation in a drug or alcohol treatment or rehabilitation program, institutional probation, suspension, expulsion and/or referral of the matter for criminal prosecution. Often these sanctions are used in conjunction. Additional disciplinary sanctions may also be imposed at the discretion of appropriate university personnel.

Accordingly, for students who choose to consume or possess drugs or to possess paraphernalia indicative of drug consumption or possession the university’s disciplinary response will likely include separation from the institution, via suspension or expulsion. This separation typically involves the loss of tuition, fees, coursework, and other privileges of an enrolled student. The university’s disciplinary sanctions can vary for alcohol. However, students who provide alcohol to others, endanger persons or property, who have multiple violations or have other violations that demonstrate a disregard for the Substance-Free Campus Policy may be placed on probation and/or separated from the institution in addition to other sanctions.

Finally, students should note that if the university’s intervention or search of a student, a student's possessions, or a student's on-campus residence discovers drugs and/or alcohol, the items may be turned over to local law enforcement. At that time, local law enforcement may choose to pursue criminal charges, which are separate from Belmont’s adjudication process for alleged violations. Underage possession of alcohol is a Class A Misdemeanor and, as such, may be reported to law enforcement authorities. 

Alcohol and Controlled Substances Notification Policy

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act permit educational institutions to disclose to the parents or legal guardians of a student, information regarding the student's violation of any federal, state or local law or any rule or policy of the institution regarding the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance, if the student is under age 21 and the institution determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to such use or possession.

The purpose of Belmont University's Alcohol & Controlled Substances Notification Policy is to foster broader engagement of the influences that shape students' attitudes and choices regarding the use of alcohol and other controlled substances. While the university holds each student personally accountable for his or her conduct while enrolled, and addresses violations directly with him or her, it recognizes and seeks to support the pivotal role parents and guardians play in students' success by notifying them of incidents involving the use of alcohol or other controlled substances.

Parents or guardians of students under 21 years of age may be notified under any of the following circumstances:

  • The student has been found responsible for violation of a federal, state or local law related to alcohol or controlled substances
  • The student has been found responsible for violation of a university policy related to alcohol or other drugs at least one time previous to the current violation
  • The student is required to be transported to a medical facility and treated because of alcohol or other drug use
  • The student has caused harm to him/herself or others while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs
  • The student was responsible for vandalism or other destruction of property while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs
  • The information regarding the student is needed in connection with an emergency to protect the health or safety of the student or other individual
  • Other appropriate circumstances as determined by the Dean of Students or designee.

Note, these guidelines do not preclude the university's contacting parents or guardians for other policy violations that may endanger the health and well-being of a student or other individuals in the community.

Health and/or Development Risks Associated with Alcohol and Drug Use

Belmont is substance-free because academic research and professional experience demonstrate the decision to abuse alcohol or use drugs has profoundly negative effects on a student’s collegiate career. Harvard’s School of Public Health found binge drinking of alcohol negatively impacts academic performance, social relationships, risk taking behaviors, and health of college students. Similarly, numerous studies have associated drug use with dependence, lower grades, an increased likelihood of dropping out, missed classes, high-risk sexual activity, difficulty finding purpose and anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that interfere with learning and personal development. The following provides further details about the health risks of specific drugs as well as alcohol.

Narcotics such as opium, morphine and heroin can cause euphoria, drowsiness, respirator depression, constricted pupils and nausea. The symptoms of an overdose of narcotics are slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma and possible death. Persons experiencing withdrawal from addiction to narcotics can experience watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills and sweating.

Depressants such as barbiturates and Quaaludes can cause slurred speech, disorientation and drunken behavior. An overdose of a depressant may result in shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma and possible death. Withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions and possible death.

Stimulants such as cocaine and crack can cause increased alertness or euphoria, and increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia and loss of appetite. An overdose of stimulants results in agitation, an increase in body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions and possible death. Withdrawal symptoms include apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression and disorientation. Hallucinogens such as LSD and amphetamines cause delusions and hallucinations, and poor perceptions of time and distance. The effects of an overdose include psychosis and possible death.

Marijuana and hashish can cause euphoria, increased appetite, relaxed inhibitions and disoriented behavior. The effects of an overdose include fatigue, paranoia and possible psychosis. Withdrawal symptoms include insomnia, hyperactivity and decreased appetite.

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, include spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory distress and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than their peers of becoming alcoholics.

Responsible Friend Clause to the Substance Free Campus Policy

This part of the Substance Free Campus policy provides for special consideration in cases where the likelihood of judicial action may create a disincentive for students to seek necessary medical assistance for intoxication. The health and safety of Belmont students is of paramount importance therefore we believe is in the best interest of this community when individuals report crimes, contact 911 or seek assistance through campus resources so that we can reduce barriers to seeking assistance for students who may be concerned about judicial consequences for themselves or the person in need. To this end, Belmont University retains the right to waive standard judicial processes for students seeking medical assistance for themselves or others due to imminent risk associated with intoxication.

If an individual seeks medical attention due to his/her level of intoxication, the University may not choose to pursue punitive sanctions against the student for violations of the Substance Free Campus Policy. Additionally, student(s) directly assisting an intoxicated student in obtaining medical attention in such a situation may also be exempt from punitive action. (Note: a student calling for medical assistance on behalf of an intoxicated individual must stay present with this student until official help from a staff member in Student Affairs or Campus Security has arrived in order to receive this consideration.)

In lieu of standard judicial processes, students receiving consideration under the Responsible Friend Clause will be required to meet with the Director for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, who may issue educational requirements such as alcohol education and/or assessment. Egregious or repeated incidents will prompt an escalated response. The student will be responsible for any costs directly associated with educational interventions. In most cases, consistent with the university’s general policies regarding alcohol and substance abuse, the student’s parents or legal guardians will be informed of the incident by letter.

This policy does not preclude disciplinary sanctions due to any other violations of the Code of Conduct, and has no bearing on the actions by police or other law enforcement personnel.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment Information

Following is a list of resources of treatment options. Belmont University does not have a contractual relationship with any of the resources listed below. They are simply listed as a courtesy to students. Students should determine for themselves whether they feel the agency will meet their needs.

  • Alcoholics Anonymous 615-831-1050
  • Narcotics Anonymous 1-800-677-1462
  • Center for Alcohol & Drug Treatment 1-800-284-2216
  • Cumberland Heights Alcohol & Drug Treatment Center 615-356-2700
  • Tennessee Christian Medical Center 615-865-0300
  • Vanderbilt Addiction Center 615-936-3555

Criminal Sanctions

The Metropolitan Government of Nashville/Davidson County prohibits the following acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:

  • It is unlawful to possess a hypodermic needle, syringe or other item used with an illicit drug or controlled substance that has traces of a controlled substance upon it.
  • It is illegal to sell or give certain types of glue or plastic cement to anyone under 21 years of age. Being under the influence of one of these substances in public is also prohibited.
  • It is unlawful for any person under the age of 19: a) to be present in an automobile on any public street when alcoholic beverages are being consumed in the automobile and b) to be present in any public park and be a companion of or otherwise associated with any person who is consuming alcoholic beverages who is not his or her parent or guardian or who has not secured written consent from the parent or guardian for the child to be present.
  • It shall be a violation for any person, while on a public street or in a place generally open to the public (and not licensed for the on-premises consumption of alcoholic beverages) to have in their possession any alcoholic beverage for the purpose of consumption in a container unless the container be commercially sealed.

Each of these offenses is punishable by a fine up to $500.

The State of Tennessee prohibits the following acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:

  • Persuading, enticing, or sending a person under 21 years of age to purchase alcoholic beverages or buying an alcoholic beverage for one under the age of 21 is punishable by up to 200 hours of community service and revocation of driving privileges.
  • It is illegal to be intoxicated in public. Such behavior can result in up to 30 days in jail and/or a $50 fine.
  • Consuming or possessing alcohol on the premises of an elementary, junior high or high school is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and/or a $50 fine.
  • Driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or drug is punishable by a jail term of up to 7 days, up to a $1500 fine and loss of driving privileges for one year for the first offence: a jail term of 11 months and 29 days, up to a $3,500 fine and loss of driving privileges for two year for the second offense; and a jail term of 11 months 29 days, up to a $10,000 fine and the loss of driving privileges for up to 10 years for the third offense. In addition, a court may order inpatient treatment at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center.
  • Killing another person while driving a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs can result in up to a 30 year sentence, a fine of up to $10,000 and the loss of one’s license for up to 10 years.
  • Being intoxicated and, as a result of intoxication, recklessly causing serious bodily injury to another while operating a motor vehicle is punishable by two to 12 years in prison, the loss of driving privileges for one year per offence with a maximum loss of 5 years and a fine up to $5,000.
  • Consuming or possessing in an open container any alcoholic beverage or beer while operating a motor vehicle may result a fine up to $50.
  • It is illegal to possess with the intent to manufacture, deliver or sell an illicit drug or controlled substance. Depending on the type of substance and its quantity, such fines will be at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, is subject to a jail term of up to 11 months and 29 days and a $2,500 fine.
  • If two or more prior convictions are present, the possible sentence increases to six years in prison and a $3,000 fine. In addition, a court may order enrollment in a drug offender school and/or community service at a drug treatment facility.
  • The casual exchange of even small amounts of an illicit drug or controlled substance with a minor can result in a penalty of up to life in prison and a $500,000 fine.
  • Inhaling, selling, giving or possessing glue, paint, gas aerosol or gas for an unlawful purpose is punishable by a jail term of 11 months and 29 days to six years and a fine of up to $3,000.
  • It is illegal to sell or buy any item that is represented to be an illicit drug or controlled substance. Such an act is punishable by up to six years in prison and a $3,000 fine.
  • It is illegal to sell, deliver or possess the seeds of jimsonweed on the premises of any elementary, junior high or high school. The penalty for such an act is 11 months and 29 days in jail and/or a fine up to $2,500.
  • It is unlawful to possess with the intent to manufacture or deliver an anabolic steroid. This act is punishable by two to 12 years in prison and a fine of up to $50,000.

The Federal Government of the United States prohibits the following drug trafficking acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:

DRUG/SCHEDULE

QUANTITY

PENALTIES

QUANTITY

PENALTIES

Cocaine (Schedule II)

500-4999 gms mixture

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

5 kgs or more mixture

First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if not an individual. 2 or More Prior Offenses: Life Imprisonment

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

5-49 gms mixture

50 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

40-399 gms mixture

400 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)

10-99 gms mixture

100 gms or more mixture

Heroin (Schedule I)

100-999 gms mixture

1 kg or more mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

1-9 gms mixture

10 gms or more mixture

Methamphetamine (Schedule II)

5-49 gms pure or 50-499 gms mixture

50 gms or more pure or 500 gms or more mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

10-99 gms pure or 100-999 gms mixture

100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

 

DRUG/SCHEDULE

QUANTITY  

PENALTIES  

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gm or more

Other Schedule III drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

30 to 999 mgs

All Other Schedule IV drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 6 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

Less than 30 mgs

All Schedule V drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 2 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

 

DRUG/SCHEDULE

QUANTITY

PENALTIES

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

Any Amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gm or more

Other Schedule III drugs

Any Amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

30 to 999 mgs

 

DRUG/SCHEDULE

QUANTITY  

1st OFFENSE  

2nd OFFENSE  

Marijuana

1,000 kg or more mixture; or 1,000 or more plants

*Not less than 10 years, not more than life *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual

*Not less than 20 years, not more than life. *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if other than an individual

Marijuana

100 kg to 999 kg mixture; or 100 to 999 plants

*Not less than 5 years, not more than 40 years *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual

*Not less than 10 years, not more than life *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual

Marijuana

More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg mixture More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 plants

*Not more than 20 years *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual

*Not more than 30 years *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than individual

Marijuana

1 to 49 plants; less than 50 kg mixture

*Not more than 5 years *Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if other than individual

*Not more than 10 years *Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual

Hashish

10 kg or less

Hashish Oil

1 kg or less

Addendum to the Substance Free Campus Policy

Belmont University has a Substance Free Campus Policy, located in The Bruin Guide, which addresses the specific rules and expectations regarding the use of alcohol and illegal drugs. Student organizations are required to be congruent with the Substance Free Campus Policy, the University’s Community Commitments and to abide by all other rules, policies and procedures of the university found in The Bruin Guide.  These expectations apply to all organizational activities both on and off campus.

In addition, student organizations may not host or participate in events held at establishments whose primary purpose is selling alcohol. 

When fundraising student organizations may not partner, receive funds or goods from venues or vendors whose primary purpose is selling alcohol. Organization members should at no time serve or dispense alcoholic beverages. All student organization fundraising activity must be in compliance with the Student Organization Fundraising policy.

Contractual Agreements Policy 

The Office of Student Activities utilizes a classification system to clarify privileges, responsibilities, governance and the legal relationship between recognized student organizations and Belmont University.  Involvement in a student organization often presents opportunities to work with off-campus third parties, such as vendors, venues and booking agencies.  Most of these working relationships utilize professional agreements in the form of a contract.  Contracts are binding agreements between two parties in which one party agrees to provide specific products or services in return for action or remuneration from the other.  Student organizations do not have the authority in themselves to make any commitments on behalf of Belmont University and enter into contractual agreements only on their own behalf.

Chartered & Affiliated Student Organizations

Belmont University views Chartered organizations as “extensions of the University” and Affiliated organizations as organizations that “assist university departments in achieving their institutional objectives”.  Thus, Chartered and Affiliated organizations are permitted to enter into contractual relationships with external third parties only if contracts are signed by the Office of the Dean of Students.  The Office of the Dean of Students requires the signature of the Chartered or Affiliated organizations’ advisor prior to its endorsement.

Please allow for five to seven school days for approval.  Contracts entered into without the prior written approval or endorsement from the Office of the Dean of Students are the exclusive responsibility of the student organization and/or its outside or inter/national entity. 

Registered & Fraternity/Sorority Student Organizations

Registered and Fraternity/Sorority organizations are considered to be independent from the university and thus they do not have the authority to commit the university to any contractual agreements. Therefore, any contract between the student organization and the outside party binds only those parties and must not include Belmont University. 

In cases where an organization incurs an expense by entering into a contractual agreement, it is the responsibility of that student organization to give an official written statement to the outside party indicating that the outside party may not rely upon Belmont University to fulfill the obligations of the contract in the event that the organization is unable to or unwilling to do so.

Below is the written statement that must be included in all Registered, Fraternity/Sorority Organization contractual agreements:

__________________ (name of student organization) is not owned, controlled, or managed by Belmont University. Belmont University assumes no responsibility for the contractual obligations of _________________(name of student organization).

Travel Policies

Vehicle Travel

In order to ensure the safety of everyone, reduce the risks, loss and liability involved in using and occupying motor vehicles and to prevent harm to Belmont property, staff, students and the public the university has created the following policies.

Chartered and Affiliated Student Organizations

Student groups recognized by the university as Chartered or Affiliated Organizations must provide the following information to the Office of Student Activities. Chartered Organizations must do so on an annual basis. Affiliated Organizations must do so any time organizational activity requires travel greater than 50 miles from campus. Organization Travel Registration Form (applicable to Affiliated organizations only)

  • Proof of acceptable Motor Vehicle Record (MVR) for all drivers dated no more than one year before the date of the scheduled event (see below for MVR procedure)
  • Copy of drivers license for all drivers
  • Copy of proof of auto insurance for all drivers
  • Medical Information Form for each traveler (must travel with copies in case of emergency)
  • Signed copy of Personal Vehicle Safety Form

Note: If a Chartered or Affiliated organization travels overnight, their Advisor must accompany the organization.

Registered and Fraternity/Sorority Student Organizations

Student groups recognized by the university as Registered or Fraternity/Sorority organizations must submit to the Office of Student Activities a completed Organization Travel Registration form and the following supporting documents each time organizational activity requires travel greater than 120 miles one-way, or overnight

  • Proof of acceptable Motor Vehicle Record (MVR) for all drivers dated no more than one year before the date of the scheduled event (see below for MVR procedure)
  • Copy of complete travel itinerary including arrival/departure time, mode of transportation, schedule of activities and lodging
  • Copy of drivers license for all drivers
  • Copy of proof of auto insurance for all drivers
  • Medical Information Form for each traveler (must travel with copies in case of emergency)
  • Completed Assumption of Risk Form for each traveler

Air and Mass-Transit Travel

In any case that a recognized student organization is traveling by air or mass transit, the student organization is required to submit to the Office of Student Activities a completed Organization Travel Registration form with the following supporting documents:

  • Copy of complete travel itinerary including arrival/departure time, mode of transportation, schedule of activities and lodging.
  • Assumption of Risk Form for each traveler
  • Medical Information Form for each traveler (must travel with copies in case of emergency) 

Chartered & Affiliated Student Organization

Personal Vehicle Driver Safety & Release Form

The purpose of this form is to ensure the safety of everyone using and occupying a personal vehicle on Belmont University business, reduce the risks, loss, and liability involved in such use, and prevent harm to Belmont University student organizations by reducing the likelihood of accidents.

The following are personal vehicle safety requirements as identified by Belmont University Office of Safety Programs:

  • Must have proof of acceptable Motor Vehicle Record on file with Advisor
  • No other driver is allowed to operate the vehicle other than those assigned for the event scheduled.
  • The possession of alcoholic beverages, firearms, or illegal drugs is prohibited inside the vehicle(s).
  • Driving, operating, using or occupying a vehicle on Belmont University business by anyone who has consumed or ingested alcohol, any controlled or illegal substance, or drug is strictly prohibited, unless the drug has been prescribed by a physician having knowledge that a vehicle may be operated or used by that person while under the influence of the controlled substance or drug.
  • Drivers are prohibited from operating a vehicle on Belmont University business when their judgment is impaired by any circumstance, such as fatigue or taking over-the-counter medications causing drowsiness.
  • The driver of the vehicle must announce to the vehicle passengers before starting the vehicle that the passengers are required to put on their seat belts.
  • The driver of the vehicle must obey all local and state traffic rules, laws and regulations at all times. Belmont University will not be responsible for any moving violations or parking citations received by the driver.
  • Drivers are prohibited from picking up hitch-hikers or giving rides to strangers.
  • All passengers must be in a seat that has a working seatbelt.
  • Drivers are prohibited from using mobile devices while driving.  Usage includes, but is not limited to, texting, emailing, or talking on the phone.

Accidents

In the event of an accident involving a vehicle on Belmont University business, several requirements must be met. These requirements are:

  • Call 911.
  • If possible, move all passengers away from the vehicle.
  • Call Advisor, if not present.  Organization Advisor will contact the university.
  • Have a police report made on the accident. Get the Accident Number and Reporting Officer’s name.
  • Obtain the names of other drivers involved, how they can be reached, and their insurance information.
  • Write down everything you can remember about the accident, including the names and phone numbers of all the vehicle occupants.
  • Upon returning to Belmont, deliver all the above information to the Office of Student Activities.

Driver Release Statement

I agree to follow all the above-mentioned rules while on Belmont University business. I agree to hold Belmont harmless from and indemnify it against any injury or harm arising out of my failure to observe these rules. I confirm that my vehicle is in sound mechanical condition and safe to operate and occupy.

 

 

__________________________                             ______________________________

Print Name                                                                   Signed Name

 

 

_________________________

Date

 

 

Branding Policy

Organizations recognized by the University as Charted and Affiliated Organizations have the privilege of using the Belmont University name and logo and, when approved, an additional mark as identified by the Office of Communications.

The Belmont University logo signifies the university’s endorsement and should be placed on all Chartered and Affiliated organization materials used as the official identifier.

The logo consists of the image and the text as one entity and may not be manipulated/separated in any way. The logo may only be reproduced in blue (PMS 281) or black. The logo may also be reversed out in white from 100% of the background color.  For visuals and complete branding guidelines go to:

http://www.belmont.edu/oc/pdf/brandbook.pdf

Film Policy

Public Performance Exhibition

The University has a copyright policy that addresses appropriate behavior regarding copyrighted works. (http://www.belmont.edu/studentaffairs/bruinguide/conduct_code/copyright.html)

The Federal Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code) governs how copyrighted materials (such as film) may be used. Buying a film, in most cases, does not give one the right to show the film outside of one’s home or residence hall room. Any public showing requires a license.

Motion picture titles are listed with certain corporations that license them for public viewing for colleges, hospitals, airlines, etc. These corporations have the authority to give customers the legal right to show movies. Films cannot be shown at meetings, events or in residence hall lounges without obtaining a public performance license, even if no admission fee is charged. If done “willfully and for purposes of commercial advantage or private financial gain,” they are a federal crime (Section 506).  Even innocent or inadvertent infringers are subject to substantial civil damages (ranging from $500 to $20,000 for each illegal showing) and other penalties such as court costs and attorney’s fees (Sections 501-505).

“Face-to-face” teaching exemption: The “face-to-face teaching exemption” is valid only in situations where a teacher is present in a classroom, using a film for the purpose of teaching to students in a so-called “face-to-face” manner. This educational exemption is narrowly defined and only applies to full-time, nonprofit academic institutions. This would include classroom and Convocation programs but does not include recreational activities.

If you are planning a Convocation program that involves showing a movie, you MUST limit attendance to Belmont students, faculty and staff.  Copyright laws do not allow non-university affiliated people to be in attendance for these types of programs.  You will be required to obtain a public performance license on Convocation film programs that are open to the public.

Film Policy Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is a Public Performance Exhibition? Any public showing of a copyrighted film that is not within the privacy of one’s home or residence hall room is a public performance.
  • How do we legally show a movie to a large group of people? You have to pay for a license to show it.
  • If we don’t charge any admission or if I own the film, can we show it without paying for the license? No, that still constitutes a public performance and it is illegal to have a public performance of a film if you have not secured the rights. .
  • If I download or rent the movie can I show it as a public performance without paying for the license? No, the “home use” versions of movies, obtained from film stores, retailers, etc., are not cleared for public performance use by colleges, schools, etc. because proper licensing fees to the copyright owners have not been paid for such use.
  • Who does Belmont typically use when ordering film? Belmont uses SWANK Motion Pictures, Inc. for most of its movie needs including Program Board’s Monthly Movie Night Program and other public viewings.
  • Does Belmont receive a discounted rate to order movies from SWANK since Program Board has a contract with them for their Monthly Movie Nights? No, the Program Board contract is completely separate and if an individual group/student organization wants to show a movie, they have to order their film selection with SWANK directly.
  • How much does it cost to show a movie on campus for a group of students? Movies vary in cost. Belmont qualifies for the small school pricing level, but it still costs between $175-$600 to show a movie for public viewing. 

Multiple Student Leadership Policy

As we aspire to be exceptional at engaging and educating students, the Division of Student Affairs believes that in order to maximize the students potential and to ensure the success of each organization, a student may hold only one concurrent executive leadership position, as defined by the Division of Student Affairs, at a time.  

Executive leadership positions as defined by the Division of Student Affairs include the following positions within the following organizations:

  • SGA (SGA)President, Vice President, Treasurer, Director of Campus Communication
  • Student Activities Programming Board (SAPB) President and Vice Presidents (2)
  • Orientation Council
  • Resident Assistants
  • IFC, NPC, NPHC Officers (President, VP & Secretary/Treasurer)
  • Fraternity & Sorority Chapter Presidents & Recruitment Chairs
  • Beaman Leadership Team
  • Towering Tradition Leaders

Presidents’ Council Attendance Policy

Presidents’ Council is a monthly informational meeting led by the Office of Student Activities.  The purpose of the Presidents’ Council is to coordinate efforts between organizations and relay information about student life. In addition the Presidents’ Council provides a forum for student organization leaders to discuss issues surrounding their specific organizations, campus life, and upcoming events.  All organizations recognized by the University as Charted, Affiliated and Fraternity/Sorority are required to have representation at all Presidents’ Council meetings.  Organizations recognized by the University as Registered organizations are required to have representation at monthly Presidents’ Council meetings if planning to participate in the Student Government Grant Petition process. 

Recognized Graduate Student Organizations are not required to attend the monthly Presidents’ Council Meetings due to the nature of their academic schedules.  If student leaders from these organizations are able to attend, they are strongly encouraged to do so, but are not required.

All Presidents’ Council meetings are listed on the BIC Calendar and on the Office of Student Activities BruinLink page. Minutes from each Presidents’ Council meeting will be published to the Student Activities BruinLink page following each meeting.

For more questions regarding the meetings and grant petitioning please contact the Office of Student Activities at 615.460.6407. 

Academic Preparation Day Policy (Dead Day Policy)

The Office of Student Activities recognizes Academic Preparation Day as a valuable opportunity for Belmont students to prepare for the final examination period at the close of the academic semester.  In support of the mission and values of Belmont’s academic programs and in order to best support the overall academic success of all Belmont students, student organizations are not allowed to program or sponsor events after the last day of classes.

Belmont University Posting Policy

Belmont University is committed to supporting student engagement in and out of the classroom and to providing a campus environment that is safe, orderly, and aesthetically pleasing. To this end, posting on campus is permitted by members of the university community subject to the guidelines and approval processes below. (Note: Materials associated with specific academic and departmental information and activities may be posted by university personnel on bulletin boards in departmental offices/areas and are not subject to approval via this posting policy.)

General Guidelines, Access, & Privileges

Posting on campus is permitted only by members of the university community. Specifically, current and recognized student organizations, university departments, academic units, faculty, staff, and students are eligible to post on campus.

Posting is permitted only on Bruin Boards and the exterior columns of the Gabhart Student Center. Posting anywhere other than these areas is prohibited. Organizations and/or individuals associated with unauthorized posting may be subject to disciplinary action.

“Chalking” surfaces and taping, stapling, or otherwise affixing materials to painted surfaces and/or glass potentially damages university property and is strictly prohibited. Additionally, flyers may not be placed on vehicles or left in university facilities.

All postings must be approved prior to posting on-campus.  Any posted material lacking university approval (denoted by an original, non-reproduced, dated approval stamp) or posted past the noted date will be removed. The university is not responsible for the condition of posted materials and will not return materials that are removed.

All postings within university dining areas, including the Curb Café, must be approved by the Sodexo General Manager.  To contact the General Manager for approval, call 460.6461. 

Approved materials may be posted on campus for up to 14 days.

Approval Process, Posting Specifications

A maximum of 20 individual posters per event may be posted. Posting materials may not exceed 11x17.  Organizations wishing to display a banner must seek separate approval via Student Activities.

Individuals wishing to post on campus must complete a Posting Request Form, available in the Office of Student Activities, and submit all materials (actual posters, flyers, etc.) to be posted.

The approval process typically takes 24 hours during the normal business work week.   

In order to be considered, postings must be initiated by a member of the Belmont Community (i.e. current students, faculty, or staff of the university), announce information applicable and/or events open to the entire Belmont University community, and demonstrate direct connection to a member of the Belmont Community or extension of the university’s life and work.

Postings with subjects or content that is not consonant with Belmont University’s Governing Ideas or the University’s Community Commitments are prohibited.  This includes but is not limited to postings that promote the sale or use of alcoholic beverages, the use or sale of tobacco or the use of sexually explicit, obscene, derogatory or inflammatory language. 

Damages and Loss of Privileges

Any organization and/or individual member of the Belmont community found in violation of the Posting Policy is subject to disciplinary action including, but not limited to, monetary fine, damage assessment, loss of posting privileges, etc. 

Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) Fan Code of Conduct

The Ohio Valley Conference and its member institutions are committed to creating a safe, comfortable, and enjoyable experience for all fans attending OVC contests.  We ask that all fans act in a responsible and courteous manner.  Abusive language or disorderly conduct is unacceptable and unwelcome.  When attending an OVC contest, fans are expected to refrain from the following behaviors:

  • Behavior that is unruly, disruptive, or illegal in nature
  • Intoxication or other signs of alcohol impairment that results in irresponsible behavior
  • Vulgar, abusive, racist, sexist, demeaning or intimidating language or obscene gestures
  • Interference with the progress of the game (including throwing objects onto the playing surface)
  • Verbal or physical harassment of opposing teams and their fans
  • Failing to follow instructions of stadium personnel

Guests will be treated in a consistent, professional and courteous manner by all facility and institutional personnel.  Fans are encouraged to report any inappropriate behavior to the nearest usher, security guard or institutional administrator.  Facility staff and/or security will promptly intervene to support an environment where fans and their guests can enjoy the event free from the above behavior.  Fans that violate these provisions will be subject to removal from the contest site.

The Ohio Valley Conference and its member institutions thank you for adhering to the provisions of the Ohio Valley Conference Fan Code of Conduct. 

Student Organization Disciplinary Process

The information provided below is a brief overview of the student organization disciplinary process. For a full review of the process please refer to The Bruin Guide.  Additionally, the university has the authority to take emergency action against an organization for alleged violations of our commitments and policies, which is outlined within this overview.

In addition to addressing violations on an organizational level, Belmont University reserves the right to address individual students through the disciplinary process. 

Reporting

Any individual inside or outside of the Belmont community may report a possible violation by a student organization of the university’s Community Commitments and policies.  Interfraternity, Panhellenic and National Pan-Hellenic Council policy violations are to be adjudicated by the appropriate campus governing councils. 

Possible university violations should be reported directly to the Director for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity by emailing studentconduct@belmont.edu.  Reports should include the following information:

  • a narrative of the incident-describe what occurred,
  • name of the organization(s) involved,
  • names of individual students (if possible),
  • and contact information of the individual reporting the incident.

Once a report has been made, the Director for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity and the Office of Student Activities will begin a review of the incident report.

Review

During the review of the incident report, details will be shared and discussed with the parties outlined below to determine if a possible violation of policy has occurred.

The parties present during a review are as follows:

  • Coordinator for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity
  • Director of Student Activities (or designee)
  • If applicable, a designee from the organization’s governing body or campus advisor will be included. 

The Dean of Students office and the Office of Student Activities will have final authority to determine whether the incident should be formally adjudicated and the decision of the assignment of the appropriate adjudication body.  The adjudication process will be guided by fundamental fairness.  If determined that there is not sufficient information to indicate a possible violation, the process will cease to continue beyond the review.      

Notice

Should a review of the report lead to a student organization’s adjudication process with the Dean of Students Office or Office of Student Activities, the student organization will receive official notice, commonly provided to the President and, if applicable the advisor, through a Community Conduct Form.  The Community Conduct Form (also known as a CC Form) acts as official university notice to the student organization.  The Community Conduct Form will document the alleged violation and direct the student organization in the next steps in the process. Please read the Community Conduct Form carefully, front and back, and substitute student organization in place of student.

Student Organization Response

When a student organization receives a Community Conduct Form, the organization may be asked to respond to the allegations at the time of notification.  The student organization has the right to respond immediately or wait 3 working days.  A student organization response (outlined in part 1 of the Community Conduct Form) requires the student organization to accept responsibility, deny responsibility, or accept partial responsibility for the violation(s) on the form.  If a student organization does not wish to respond immediately, the student organization has 3 working days to respond to the notification and must set up another meeting with the Coordinator for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity to determine the next steps within the process.

Failure to respond and/or schedule an appointment may result in the adjudication of a student organization’s case in abstention.

Adjudication

There are two methods of Belmont University adjudication:  Conference and Inquiry.  A conference may be conducted when a student organization has accepted responsibility for the violation(s).  An inquiry is conducted when a student organization either does not accept responsibility or accepts some but not all responsibility.  The purpose of an inquiry is to find the facts of the incident and determine if the student organization is responsible or not responsible for the alleged violations.   

There are many Belmont University adjudication bodies and officers that are trained and capable of conducting a conference or inquiry.  The Community Conduct Board is one entity trained to hear student organization inquiries and conferences. In addition, other University adjudication officers may include a designee of the Office of Student Activities or designee of the Dean of Students Office.

University Response

After a Belmont University disciplinary process the student organization will receive a response from the university.  The response indicates the decision by the University of responsible or not responsible.  If the student organization is found responsible, the University will have determined appropriate sanctions, which will be outlined within this response.  Additionally, the student organization’s outcome will be communicated with the organization’s governing body or campus advisor, if applicable. 

Sanctions

The philosophy behind Belmont University’s sanctioning process is education.  It is designed to be developmental.  Therefore, when a student organization is called to face the consequences of its actions, the primary focus is on assisting the members of the organization in learning why the behavior is inappropriate.  In determining appropriate sanctions for conduct violations, the institution is guided by three considerations:  education, restitution, and punishment.  More information about the three considerations and sanctions can be found in The Bruin Guide. 

Appeal Process

An appeal is not an inquiry or rehearing of the case, but rather the opportunity for the organization to prove that an error has occurred during the initial inquiry/conference process.  The bases for an appeal must address one or more of the following criteria: 

  • There is evidence that appropriate procedures were not followed which may have a bearing on the initial decision.
  • New information that was not available at the time of the original inquiry/conference which may have a bearing on the initial decision.
  • There is evidence of bias that may have a bearing on the initial decision.
  • There is reason to believe the sanction(s) is extraordinarily disproportionate to the violation.

The initial University response can be appealed.  In order to appeal, a student organization must complete the Appeal Request Form within 3 working days of receiving the university’s written response and submit the Appeal Request Form to the Dean of Students Office (located in the Beaman Student Life Center 200). 

If you have further questions, regarding the appeal process, please contact the Coordinator for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity at 615-460-6407 or at studentconduct@belmont.edu.



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